If you get involved in an incident that results in a blow to the skull, it is very possible that you might also face a brain injury. But just how severe does the damage have to be in order for the brain injury to be considered traumatic? 

Perhaps surprisingly, it doesn’t take a lot to give someone a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Though your skull is thick and built defensively, the brain can still move around inside the skull itself. This means that even injuries that don’t damage your skull can still cause concussions, contusions, and swelling of the brain due to the brain hitting the inside of your skull. 

A number of incidents have reportedly been responsible for TBIs before. They range from construction zone accidents to car crashes, and have even included contact sports injuries in non-professional sports leagues.  

Properly protecting yourself with safety gear may not necessarily be enough to ward off damage, either. For example, while wearing a helmet can help protect your head from damage in a bike crash, it doesn’t provide fool-proof coverage. You can still hit your head hard enough to cause injury to your brain. 

If you have suffered through any incident that has led to a traumatic brain injury, consider taking a look at our web page on such injuries and their impact on your health and life. You may also want to contact an attorney who can help you seek compensation for the health costs that may accrue as you heal from the incident.